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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of Occupational exposure to silica and cancer risk found in the catalog.

Occupational exposure to silica and cancer risk

Occupational exposure to silica and cancer risk

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  • 21 Currently reading

Published by International Agency for Research on Cancer, Distributed in the USA by Oxford University Press in Lyon, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lungs -- Cancer -- Epidemiology.,
  • Silica -- Carcinogenicity.,
  • Silicosis.,
  • Industrial toxicology.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by L. Simonato ... [et al.].
    SeriesIARC scientific publications,, no. 97
    ContributionsSimonato, L., International Agency for Research on Cancer.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRA645.C3 O23 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 124 p. :
    Number of Pages124
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1977869M
    ISBN 109283211979
    LC Control Number90220747

    Abstract. Background Occupational exposure to silica dust occurs in many workplaces and is well known to cause silicosis. However, the link between silica exposure, silicosis and other diseases is still disputed. Aims To evaluate cause-specific mortality in a cohort of Italian silicotics.. Methods The cohort included male compensated for silicosis between and , alive on 1 January.


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Occupational exposure to silica and cancer risk Download PDF EPUB FB2

You are here: Home / Book and Report Series / IARC Scientific Publications / Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk IARC Scientific Publication No. Get this from a library. Occupational exposure to silica and cancer risk.

[L Simonato; International Agency for Research on Cancer.;]. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 45(2) June with 20 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk Reviewed by Raymond Agius Department of Community Medicine, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Teviot Place, EdinburghAuthor: Raymond Agius.

With regard to lung cancer histology and occupational exposure to crystalline silica, the results indicate a clearly increased risk for the main histologic types of lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma (OR = ; CI = –) and adenocarcinoma (; –; Table 4).

The risk estimates were, however, highest for the categories with. crystalline silica which have been investigated in numerous epidemiological studies, almost all dealing with workplace exposures. The section mostly focuses on studies of lung cancer but also includes discussion of suggestive evidence that exposure to silica may increase the risk of esophageal cancer and possibly other cancers.

Crystalline silica is a recognized carcinogen, but the association with lung cancer at lower levels of exposure has not been well characterized.

This study investigated the relationship between occupational silica exposure and lung cancer and the combined effects of cigarette smoking and silica exposure on lung cancer risk. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and the risk of lung cancer in Canadian men.

International Journal of Cancer ;(1) Crystalline silica is a recognized carcinogen, but the association with lung cancer at lower levels of exposure has not been well characterized. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final ruling for exposure to silica dust.

The standard is an effort to protect workers in construction, general industry and maritime from silicosis, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney disease.

Silica exposure was associated with a higher risk of mortality among individuals with all diseases, lung cancer, respiratory tuberculosis, cardiovascular diseases, and diseases of the respiratory. Long-term silica dust exposure was associated with substantially increased mortality among Chinese workers.

The increased risk was observed not only for deaths due to respiratory diseases and lung cancer, but also for deaths due to cardiovascular disease. Please see later in the article for the Edit. Our results imply a threshold effect for occupational silica exposure but suggest that there is no threshold below which exposure to asbestos is safe.

Additional evidence and replication in independent populations would strengthen the case for increasing prevention efforts specifically targeting silica exposure as a risk factor for bladder cancer. Background: Ina Monograph from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified occupational exposure to crystalline silica as carcinogenic to humans.

Large amounts of epidemiological data have been published subsequently. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological investigations on silica exposure and lung cancer risk published after the IARC. Introduction. Silica has recently been in the news because this past August the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed a new rule lowering the occupational limit from mg/m 3 ( mg/m 3 for the construction industry) to mg/m 3.

1 The current standard was set in Although regulation of occupational exposures at the current standard has. The few population-based studies that evaluated silica exposure have suggested an elevated risk of lung cancer with occupational silica exposure ().

In the early s, we carried out a population-based case-control study in Montreal, Canada, to explore the possible associations between hundreds of occupational substances and multiple. Objectives The lung cancer carcinogenicity of crystalline silica dust remains the subject of discussion. Epidemiological evidence is based on occupational cohort studies and population-based case–control studies.

The aim of this study was to assess associations between male lung cancer risk and silica exposure in a population-based cohort study. Methods The study was conducted among men aged. Work and exposure to silica dust. ApproximatelyAustralian workers were exposed to silica dust in the workplace in It has been estimated that of these will develop a lung cancer over the course of their life as a result of that exposure.

Exposure of workers to respirable crystalline silica is associated with elevated rates of lung cancer. The strongest link between human lung cancer and exposure to respirable crystalline silica has been seen in studies of quarry and granite workers and workers involved in ceramic, pottery, refractory brick, and certain earth industries.

Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that silica is an important risk factor for lung cancer. This risk could not be explained by exposure to other occupational carcinogens or smoking, and it was present for the main histologic types of lung cancer, different sources of silica exposure, and different industrial settings.

Crystalline silica is considered as one of the most common and serious occupational hazards to workers’ health. Although its association with lung cancer has been studied for many decades, the conclusion remains somewhat controversial.

Our objectives are to review and summarize the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between occupational silica exposure and risk of lung cancer.

The review indicates a significant risk of chronic silicosis for workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica over a working lifetime at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL), the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) PEL, or the National Institute for Occupational Safety.

The excess lifetime risk of death from lung cancer due to silica exposure was much higher than the % standard suggested by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

We found a similar association between silica exposure and lung cancer in this study as that found by Steenland et al. in a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies. The. Past asbestos exposure is the leading cause of deaths from occupational cancer today.

Other major causes of occupational cancer include past exposure to silica, solar radiation, mineral oils and shift work. The construction industry has the largest estimate of occupational cancer cases, with about 3, Occupational Exposure to Coal, Genotoxicity, and Cancer Risk.

By Grethel León-Mejía, Milton Quintana Sosa, Paula Rohr, Katia Kvitko, João Antonio Pêgas Henriques and Juliana da Silva. Submitted: October 30th Reviewed: February 12th Published: June 16th.

Occupational cancers are those that occur due to exposure to carcinogenic (cancer-causing) agents in the workplace. Such exposures include: a wide range of different industrial chemicals, dusts, metals and combustion products (e.g.

asbestos or diesel engine exhaust). This risk could not be explained by exposure to other occupational carcinogens or smoking, and it was present for the main histologic types of lung cancer, different sources of silica exposure, and different industrial settings. Silicosis is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust.

It is marked by inflammation and scarring in the form of nodular lesions in the upper lobes of the is a type of pneumoconiosis.

Silicosis (particularly the acute form) is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, fever, and cyanosis (bluish skin). It may often be misdiagnosed as. The likelihood of getting lung cancer from silica exposure follows a similar pattern, with a significant risk at levels around mg/m3 over many years, or higher exposures in a shorter period of time.

Exposure to occupational carcinogens is often overlooked as a contributor to the burden of cancer. To estimate the proportion of cancer cases attributable to occupational exposure in Canada inexposure prevalence and levels of 44 carcinogens were informed by data from the Canadian carcinogen exposure surveillance project (CAREX Canada).

What occupational activities risk exposure?²,³,⁶. As silica is such an accessible and useful mineral, it is found in lots of products and used in many workplace and industry activities. Activities include: Abrasive blasting (blasting tools can contain a maximum of 1% of crystalline silica).

Total duration of employment in taconite mining did not appear to increase the risk of lung cancer (OR =95% CI: –). An inverse association between risk and exposure was observed across quartiles for EMP and silica exposure however, none of the quartiles exhibited a significant increase in risk.

This study examines the relationship between occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer in an occupationally diverse male population. METHODS: Two large population-based case-control studies of lung cancer were conducted in Montreal, one in ( cases, population controls, 1, cancer controls) and the second in ated silica exposure have suggested an elevated risk of lung cancer with occupational silica exposure ().

In the early s, we carried out a population-based case-control study in Montreal, Canada, to explore the possible associations between hundreds of occupational substances and multiple cancer sites, including lung can-cer (13). One occupational agent of particular interest is asbestos, which is known to cause inflammation and increase the risk of fibrosis and cancer in the lungs.

12 However, the knowledge regarding any association between exposure to asbestos and RA is scarce. 4 5 13 14 Both asbestos and silica are naturally occurring silicon-containing compounds. Objective: To use various exposure-response models to estimate the risk of mortality from lung cancer due to occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust.

Methods: Data from a cohort mortality study of white male California diatomaceous earth mining and processing workers exposed to crystalline silica dust (mainly cristobalite) were reanalyzed with Poisson regression and. Physical activity has been associated with reduced risk of breast cancer in women in previous studies [21,22].

In a meta-analysis of 31 prospective studies, average breast cancer risk reduction was 12% for leisure time and occupational physical activity combined, and 10% for occupational physical activity alone. Pooled exposure-response analyses and risk assessment for lung cancer in 10 cohorts of silica-exposed workers: an IARC multicentre study.

Cancer Causes Control. ;12(9)– PubMed CrossRef PubMedCentral Google Scholar. Dose-Response Relationship Between Estimated Exposure to Silica and Relative Risk of Lung Cancer with its 95% Confidence Limit Effects on Pulmonary Function Associated with Occupational Exposure to c-Silica in Workers Lung Cancer Risk in Smokers and Nonsmokers Exposed to c-Silica.

Epidemiological studies show a relationship between occupational exposure to crystalline silica and increased risk of lung cancer, with the strongest link in quarry and granite workers and workers involved in ceramic, pottery, refractory brick, and diatomaceous earth industries.

Increased risk was not evident with exposure to amorphous silica. Tee L. Guidotti, Silica Exposure and Risk of Lung Cancer: Pathophysiological Hypotheses in Research Amenable to Testing by Epidemiological Methods, Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 10, 12, (), ().Cytogenetic effects of occupational exposure to benzidine and benzidine-based dyes (Direct Black 38 and Direct Blue 6) were studied in workers at a manufacturing plant in Bulgaria having a recognized high risk of occupational cancer.

Twenty-three workers exposed for a mean of 15 years were compared with 30 controls presumed to have no exposure.Recently, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) conducted an epidemiological review study on lung cancer and occupational exposure to crystalline silica, and introduced silica in the form of quartz and cristobalite as group 1 carcinogenic humans (2, 16).